Dayton’s four-legged excellent helped keep a city safe

March 27, 2018 - metal shoes

Retired Dayton Police Officer Rick Shiverdecker’s home is filled with mementos that remind him of a years he spent patrolling downtown Dayton with his partner.

A scrapbook filled with photographs and journal clippings fact their work together, a portrayal of his comrade hangs on a bedroom wall and a acknowledgment Shiverdecker wrote for his partner’s wake in 1998 is tighten during hand.


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 The Dayton mounted look-out in 1896. DAYTON POLICE HISTORY FOUNDATION photo


The Dayton mounted look-out in 1896. DAYTON POLICE HISTORY FOUNDATION

Shiverdecker, who late from a military dialect in 2011, worked for a decade on Dayton’s Mounted Patrol Unit. His partner, Traveller, was an 8-year-old entertain equine brew when a dual were interconnected in 1989.

“It was such a good office from a aspect that we were a closest thing to a knight,” Shiverdecker said. “You’ve got to be accessible and good and save everybody, though on a other palm when we are called into movement you’ve got to be organisation and decisive.”

In a some-more than 150-year story of a Dayton Police Department, mounted section units have been in use twice. The strange Dayton Mounted Patrol Unit was shaped in 1892.

Just 7 years after it began, tragedy struck a unit. Patrolman William Dalton died while posterior “a peddler” on horseback according to a story in a Aug. 10, 1899, book of a Dayton Daily News.

“While roving during roughly breakneck speed,” according to a account, a military officer attempted to navigate his equine between an ice car and a cart in office of a offender.


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 Dayton Police Officer Rick Shiverdecker and Traveller were interconnected together in 1989 during a start of Dayton's complicated mounted section unit. photo


Dayton Police Officer Rick Shiverdecker and Traveller were interconnected together in 1989 during a start of Dayton’s complicated mounted section unit. … review more

Thrown to a travel and trampled by his horse, Dalton postulated a skull detonate and other injuries that killed him. He is a usually Dayton military officer to die while on horseback and a third to die in a line of duty, according to a Dayton Police History Foundation.

In a early 1900s motorized wagons, motorcycles and automobiles became a new collection of a trade for a military force, finale a equine patrol.

Dayton Police Chief James Newby resurrected a equine section in 1989 as partial of an beginning to raise law coercion downtown. Shiverdecker was among a new group of 12 officers who would keep watch on horseback again.

For 14 years, a streets of downtown Dayton were patrolled by Dayton’s four-legged excellent with names like Cody, Boomer, Charlie and Doc.

Traveller and Shiverdecker could be found many mornings during a dilemma of Second and Jefferson streets nearby a Kettering Tower, gripping an eye out for jaywalkers, directing traffic, and interacting with a public.


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 Police officer Tim Zimmer and his equine


Police officer Tim Zimmer and his equine “Peanut” check a new downtown Dayton watering hole in 1989 nearby Fourth Street and … review more

As pedestrians headed to work they mostly greeted a pair, or common tips about questionable activity they had seen. “We were a guide for people,” Shiverdecker said. “We were receptive and people came adult and talked.”

Police officers on horseback were not usually good for open family — they were also a profitable apparatus for military work.

The horses could wade into crowds to assistance keep control, as they did during a 1994 Ku Klux Klan convene during Courthouse Square. Their presence, total with a learned officer, could deescalate situations before they got out of hand, Shiverdecker said. And sitting high on tip of a equine gave a officers a outrageous steer advantage.


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 Students Kenny Kelly, Tom Finfrock and Christopher Moran and their teacher, Carol Suddath get a tighten looks during horses with a photo


Students Kenny Kelly, Tom Finfrock and Christopher Moran and their teacher, Carol Suddath get a tighten looks during horses with a … review more

The military officers and their horses connected during their years patrolling together. Shiverdecker, who refers to his long-time partner as “Traveller a consternation horse,” kept a accumulate of Atomic Fireball cinnamon-flavored candy, Traveller’s favorite, in his saddlebag.

“You could hear it go click, click, click as he rolled it around his teeth and afterwards we heard crunch,” pronounced Shiverdecker, who was bewildered his equine would gnaw a sharp candy whole.

The horses knew a streets they policed as good as their tellurian partners. While on avocation in a Oregon District one night, Shiverdecker and Traveller encountered a male who had only attacked a couple.

As they gave chase, Shiverdecker, who was on his radio directing officers to a stage as he attempted to keep an eye on a journey suspect, beheld Traveller was racing side to side as he cantered along Green Street. The horse, who wore steel shoes, was informed with any manhole cover in a travel and knew to evasion them, avoiding a potentially comfortless fall.

“You do your best roving when we don’t consider about riding, and a equine knows that, too,” pronounced Shiverdecker.

Demands on manpower, budgetary considerations and changes in government character eventually led to a passing of a mounted section in 2003.


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 The Dayton Police Mounted Patrol in 1989. DAYTON POLICE HISTORY FOUNDATION photo


The Dayton Police Mounted Patrol in 1989. DAYTON POLICE HISTORY FOUNDATION

Shiverdecker eliminated to a Dayton Police Academy in 1998, a same year he remained during Traveller’s side, remembering him “as a loyal travel cop,” when his equine partner died of heart failure.

“I consider we can pronounce for all a guys and girls in a section unit. We skip a open as most as they skip us,” pronounced Shiverdecker. “Being a military equine man had to be one of a coolest jobs in a world.”



ABOUT THIS FEATURE

HISTORY EXTRA is a weekly impressive story underline showcasing a Miami Valley’s abounding heritage. If we have a singular set of ancestral photos found in your parents’ or grandparents’ integument that depicts a past in a Miami Valley, hit Lisa Powell during 937-225-2229 or during Lisa.Powell@coxinc.com.

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